Soil and Water Conservation Districts

Soil and Water Conservation Districts
The conservation of soil and water may not be something you think of daily, but in New Mexico it is so vital that people are elected to office to do just that.

Do you know what soil and water conservation district you live in?  It’s a safe bet that unless you’re a farmer or rancher, you probably don’t know and that’s because while their work is invaluable for the ag community, they can be pretty obscure to everyone else.  Soil and water conservation districts are state government agencies, governed by boards of supervisors, local landowners, and residents who are either elected or appointed.  There are 47 districts across the state, each with their own board of supervisors.  Districts were authorized in 1978 with a mission to conserve and develop the natural resources of the state, provide for flood control, preserve wildlife, and protect the tax base.  That part about protecting the tax base primarily refers to the prevention of flood events through the construction of check dams which of course protect both homes and agricultural land alike.  That’s one of the reasons farmers and ranchers care so much about the make-up of the board, they can do a lot to help promote food production within their district while preserving natural resources.